Lexical decision in aging: Stimulus variables and response time components

2016-07-12T15:54:24Z (GMT) by Jake Kurczek Jean K Gordon
<div> <div> <div>Kurczek, J. & Gordon, J.K. (2009, October). Lexical decision in aging: Stimulus variables and response time components. <i>Poster presentation at the Aging and Speech Communication Conference</i>, Bloomington, IN.</div><ul> <li> <p>Word retrieval is susceptible to break down with age and brain damage (especially aphasia) </p> </li> <li> <p>Different types of variables affect word retrieval: </p> <p>1. Lexical (e.g. frequency, phonological neighborhood density) (Figure 4) 2. Sub-lexical (e.g. phonotactics, length) (Figure 4)<br> 3. Subject (e.g. age, education, sensory functioning)<br> 4. Task factors (e.g. mode of retrieval, composition of the stimulus set) </p> </li> <li> <p>Neighborhood density refers to the number of similar sounding words activated at the same time as the target: </p> <p>• Past research has indicated a competitive effect of neighborhood density for tasks that promote processing at the lexical level and a facilitative effect for tasks that promote processing at the sub-lexical level (Goldinger et al., 1990; Vitevitch & Luce, 1998; Vitevitch et al., 1999) </p> </li> <li> <p>Theories of cognitive aging may explain behavioral changes observed: • Sensory Deficit </p> <p>• Decrease of Inhibition </p> <p>• Slowing of processing speed </p> </li> <li> <p>Speed and accuracy with which words or decisions about words can be made can inform us </p> <p>about the form and function of the mental lexicon (Figure 1) </p></li><li><p>Psychological processes behind the mental lexicon and two-choice decisions can be further elucidated with the diffusion model</p></li> </ul> </div> </div>