Light-Induced Interfacial Dynamics Dramatically Improve the Photocurrent in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: An Electrolyte Effect

Published on 2018-08-09T23:44:29Z (GMT) by
A significant increase in the photocurrent generation during light soaking for solar cells sensitized by the triphenylamine-based D−π–A organic dyes (PD2 and LEG1) and mediated by cobalt bipyridine redox complexes has been observed and investigated. The crucial role of the electrolyte has been identified in the performance improvement. Control experiments based on a pre-treatment strategy reveals TBP as the origin. The increase in the current and IPCE has been interpreted by the interfacial charge-transfer kinetics studies. A slow component in the injection kinetics was exposed for this system. This change explains the increase in the electron lifetime and collection efficiency. Photoelectron spectroscopic measurements show energy shifts at the dye/TiO<sub>2</sub> interface, leading us to formulate a hypothesis with respect to an electrolyte-induced dye reorganization at the surface.

Cite this collection

Gao, Jiajia; El-Zohry, Ahmed M.; Trilaksana, Herri; Gabrielsson, Erik; Leandri, Valentina; Ellis, Hanna; et al. (2018): Light-Induced

Interfacial Dynamics Dramatically Improve

the Photocurrent in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: An Electrolyte Effect. ACS Publications. Collection.