Post-print: The time-course of inflammatory cytokine secretion in a rat model of postoperative pain does not coincide with the onset of mechanical hyperalgesia. DOI: 10.1139/Y07-054

Post-print copy of: Loram LC, Themistocleous AC, Fick LG, Kamerman PR. The time course of inflammatory cytokine secretion in a rat model of postoperative pain does not coincide with the onset of mechanical hyperalgesia. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology 85: 613-620, 2007. DOI: 10.1139/Y07-054, PMID: 17823623

Abstract: We characterized the time course of inflammatory cytokine release at the site of injury and in plasma after surgery on the rat tail. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats had a 20 mm long incision made through the skin and fascia of their tails. Control rats were anesthetized, but no incision was made. Blood and tissue samples were taken 2 h and 1, 2, 4, and 8 days after surgery and analysed by ELISA for interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). In another group of rats, daily behavioral measurements were made of the rats' responses to a blunt noxious mechanical stimulus (4 Newtons) applied to their tails. Primary hyperalgesia developed within 2 h of surgery and lasted for 6 days. The tissue concentrations of IL-1beta, IL-6, and CINC-1 increased within 24 h of surgery, and TNF-alpha concentration increased within 48 h of surgery. Thereafter, cytokine concentrations remained elevated for 4 (IL-1beta and IL-6) to 8 days (CINC-1, TNF-alpha) after surgery. Control animals did not develop hyperalgesia and no changes in cytokines concentrations were detected. Thus, in our model of postoperative pain, secretion of inflammatory cytokines IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha, and CINC-1 was not essential for the initiation of postoperative hyperalgesia.