DataSheet1_The Impact of Rare Human Variants on Barrier-To-Auto-Integration Factor 1 (Banf1) Structure and Function.PDF (245.59 kB)
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DataSheet1_The Impact of Rare Human Variants on Barrier-To-Auto-Integration Factor 1 (Banf1) Structure and Function.PDF

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posted on 08.11.2021, 04:08 by Maddison Rose, Bond Bai, Ming Tang, Chee Man Cheong, Sam Beard, Joshua T. Burgess, Mark N. Adams, Kenneth J. O’Byrne, Derek J. Richard, Neha S. Gandhi, Emma Bolderson

Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor 1 (Banf1/BAF) is a critical component of the nuclear envelope and is involved in the maintenance of chromatin structure and genome stability. Banf1 is a small DNA binding protein that is conserved amongst multicellular eukaryotes. Banf1 functions as a dimer, and binds non-specifically to the phosphate backbone of DNA, compacting the DNA in a looping process. The loss of Banf1 results in loss of nuclear envelope integrity and aberrant chromatin organisation. Significantly, mutations in Banf1 are associated with the severe premature ageing syndrome, Néstor–Guillermo Progeria Syndrome. Previously, rare human variants of Banf1 have been identified, however the impact of these variants on Banf1 function has not been explored. Here, using in silico modelling, biophysical and cell-based approaches, we investigate the effect of rare human variants on Banf1 structure and function. We show that these variants do not significantly alter the secondary structure of Banf1, but several single amino acid variants in the N- and C-terminus of Banf1 impact upon the DNA binding ability of Banf1, without altering Banf1 localisation or nuclear integrity. The functional characterisation of these variants provides further insight into Banf1 structure and function and may aid future studies examining the potential impact of Banf1 function on nuclear structure and human health.

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