Portacaval Shunt Established in Six Dogs Using Magnetic Compression Technique

<div><p>Background and Aims</p><p>Installing the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt for portal hypertension is relatively safe, but complications are still high. To explore a new method of portacaval shunt, the magnetic compression technique was introduced into the shunting procedure.</p> <p>Methods</p><p>A portal-inferior vena cava shunt was performed on 6 male mongrel dogs by two hemocompatible Nd-Fe-B permanent magnets, parent and daughter. The parent magnet was applied to the inferior vena cava guided by a catheter through the femoral vein. The daughter magnet was moved to the anastomosis position on the portal vein with a balloon catheter through the splenic vein. After the daughter magnet reached the target position, the two magnets acted to compress the vessel wall and hold it in place. Five to 7 days later, under X-ray guidance, the magnets were detached from the vessel wall with a rosch-uchida transjugular liver access set. One month later, histological analysis and portal venography were performed.</p> <p>Results</p><p>5-7 days after the first surgery, a mild intimal hyperplasia in the portal vein and the inferior vena cava, and continuity of the vascular adventitia from the portal vein to the inferior vena cava as observed. During the second surgery, the contrast media could be observed flowing from the portal vein into the inferior vena cava. Portal venography revealed that the portosystemic shunt was still present one month after the second surgery.</p> <p>Conclusions</p><p>Magnamosis via a device of novel design was successfully used to establish a portacaval shunt in dogs.</p> </div>