Highlight features of the phylogroups of <i>Pseudomonas syringae</i> based on the profiles of strains characterized to date.

<p>These features are a general summary of the phenotypic and genotypic profiles garnered in this study as well as in other reports cited throughout the text above.</p>a<p>Representatives of some phylogroups have been found associated only with plants, or only in non-agricultural (environmental) habitats or are ubiquitously present in all or nearly all habitats investigated to date.</p>b<p>Both canonical and non-canonical (atypical) T3SS are found in some phylogroups, but they have not been found to co-exist in the same strain.</p>c<p>This property has not been described to date.</p>d<p>The production of broad host range toxins is based on the results of antibiosis tests reported in this work.</p>e<p>Aggressiveness on cantaloupe seedlings was used as a proxy for host range as described previously <a href="http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0105547#pone.0105547-Morris2" target="_blank">[17]</a>.</p><p>Here, host range concerns the number of plant species on which disease symptoms are caused. The description presented for each phylogroup is relative to the other phylogroups and is based on the results of our analyses here. The range of epiphytic plants that can be colonized asymptomatically can be much larger than the host range for disease.</p>f<p>Ice nucleation activity.</p><p>Highlight features of the phylogroups of <i>Pseudomonas syringae</i> based on the profiles of strains characterized to date.</p>