Most appropriate information communication technology for health education in HIV management in rural communities: a systematic review

2018-05-14T07:10:45Z (GMT) by Petra Bester
<p><b>Most appropriate information communication technology for health education in HIV management in rural communities: a systematic review</b></p> <p><b><u><sup> </sup></u></b></p> <p>TL Malinga, <b><u>P Bester</u></b>, K Smit</p> <p> </p> <p>Presenting author’s e-mail: petra.bester@nwu.ac.za</p> <p> </p> <p>Africa Unit for Transdisciplinary Health Research (AUTHeR) Faculty of Health Sciences, North-West University (NWU), Potchefstroom, South Africa</p> <p> </p> <p><b>BACKGROUND</b></p> <p>HIV management (testing, disclosure, ART, etc.) implies complex regimens activated and monitored within overburdened health systems. Innovative health education extending beyond facility borders needed to inform and empower citizens. ICT has such potential in rural contexts. Nearly two decades into eHealth and multiple ICT-related research, the most appropriate ICT in rural communities remains uncertain. </p> <p><b>OBJECTIVE</b></p> <p>To identify most appropriate ICTs for health education in HIV management in rural communities.</p> <p><b>METHOD</b></p> <p>Systematic review methodology was rigorously followed. The technology acceptance model (TAM) and eHealth model for developing countries framed this review. Articles published on appropriateness of ICT for HIV management in rural communities were eligible for inclusion. Several databases were searched, using MeSH and key terms separated by Boolean operators. Searches were limited from 1999 to 2016. <sup></sup></p> <p><b>RESULTS</b></p> <p>Forty-five articles were retrieved (through electronic searches and other resources), of which seven (n7) were eligible for inclusion (n4 quantitative -, n5 qualitative designs). Articles were analysed according to ease-of-use and usefulness (from TAM); context, content, connectivity, capacity, community (from eHealth model). ICTs used were sms/mobile phones (n4); personal development assistant (PDA) (n1), website (n1); various/non-specified (n3). Ease-of-use was recognised (n8), but usefulness less prominent. Awareness of rural context was reported. Connectivity wasn’t always possible but not a limiter. ICT may fortify inequality, but can unlock capacity. </p> <p><b>CONCLUSIONS</b></p> <p>Despite the known potential of ICT, evidence remains scattered.<b> </b>SMS more feasible within rural communities. Ease-of-use exceeded usefulness. Challenge the traditional, consider first the context and connectivity, then the content. <b></b></p>