Geochemistry and geochronology of Upper Permian–Upper Triassic volcanic rocks in eastern Jilin Province, NE China: implications for the tectonic evolution of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean

<p>We present zircon U–Pb dating, whole-rock geochemistry, and Sr–Nd isotope results for the Upper Permian–Upper Triassic volcanic rocks to constrain the timing of the final closure of the eastern segment of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean. The volcanic rocks were mainly collected from the Yanbian area in eastern Jilin Province, northeastern China. The zircon U–Pb dating results indicate that the samples can be classified as Upper Permian–Lower Triassic basalts (ca. 262–244 Ma) and Upper Triassic dacites (ca. 216 Ma). The whole-rock geochemical results indicate that the rocks predominately belong to the medium-K and high-K calc-alkaline series. The basalts are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs, e.g. Ba and K) and depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs, e.g. Nb and Ta), with weak positive Eu anomalies. The dacites are enriched in LILEs (e.g. Rb, Ba, Th, and K) and light rare earth elements (LREEs) and marked depletion in some HFSEs (e.g. Nb, Ta, and Ti), with significant negative Sr, P, and Eu anomalies. Moreover, the Upper Permian–Lower Triassic basalts have low initial <sup>87</sup>Sr/<sup>86</sup>Sr ratios (0.7037–0.7048) and high <i>ε</i><sub>Nd</sub> values (4.4–5.4). In contrast, the Upper Triassic dacites possess relatively high initial <sup>87</sup>Sr/<sup>86</sup>Sr ratios (0.7052) compared with their low <i>ε</i><sub>Nd</sub> values (1.4). The basaltic magma likely originated from the partial melting of a depleted mantle wedge metasomatized by subduction-related fluids, and the felsic magmas likely originated from the partial melting of a dominantly juvenile source with a minor component of ancient crust. Taken together, the Upper Permian–Lower Triassic basalts (ca. 262–244 Ma) are arc basalts that formed in an active continental margin setting, and the Upper Triassic dacites (ca. 216 Ma) are A-type granitic rocks that formed in an extensional setting. Therefore, the final closure of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean occurred during the Middle–Late Triassic.</p>