Elizabeth Grosz. The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution and the Untimely. Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 2004; Elizabeth Grosz. Time Travels: Feminism, Nature, Power. Sydney: Allen and Unwin, 2005 [Book review]

2017-05-21T04:26:41Z (GMT) by Claire Perkins
With her two books, <i>The Nick of Time</i> and <i>Time Travels</i>, Elizabeth Grosz joins those writers and thinkers for whom the phenomenon of temporality holds a particular fascination. Grosz acknowledges early on in <i>The Nick of Time</i> that there are many Western philosophical traditions that could hold direct relevance for her attempt to reconsider the relationship between time and life, but which are nonetheless neglected. She identifies, in particular, the pragmatic and phenomenological traditions, which are both passed over in favour of the first book's exclusive focus on Charles Darwin, Friedrich Nietzsche and Henri Bergson, and the second's wider, but still eclectic, additions to this trio: Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Alfred Kinsey, William James, Luce Irigaray and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.