Characterization of transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato plants antisensed for the ethylene receptor gene <i>CcEIN4</i> under NaCl stress

<div><p>The plant hormone ethylene (C<sub>2</sub>H<sub>4</sub>) plays important roles in plant growth and development. Here, we report physiological response of transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato plants, antisensed for the ethylene receptor gene <i>CcEIN4</i> from coffee trees (<i>Coffea canephora</i>), under salinity stress. Results showed that the germination rate was higher in seeds collected from transgenic plants than that seeds from wild plants under salt stress condition. Growth of transgenic Arabidopsis and tomato plants was less sensitive to salt stress than wild type. Some transgenic plants showed a stimulation of radicle length and root system growth. The better salt tolerance observed in transgenic tomatoes lines can be explained by: ability to control the accumulation of Na<sup>+</sup> and Cl<sup>−</sup> in shoots and better K<sup>+</sup> and Ca<sup>2 +</sup> uptake, resulting in higher K<sup>+</sup>:Na<sup>+</sup> and Ca<sup>2 +</sup>:Na<sup>+</sup> ratios. These results suggest that ethylene perception is involved in the plant response to saline stress and plays a pivotal role in the plant salt tolerance.</p></div>