The Impact of Commonly Used Alkylating Agents on Artifactual Peptide Modification

Published on 2018-02-09T23:46:29Z (GMT) by
Iodoacetamide is by far the most commonly used agent for alkylation of cysteine during sample preparation for proteomics. An alternative, 2-chloroacetamide, has recently been suggested to reduce the alkylation of residues other than cysteine, such as the N-terminus, Asp, Glu, Lys, Ser, Thr, and Tyr. Here we show that although 2-chloroacetamide reduces the level of off-target alkylation, it exhibits a range of adverse effects. The most significant of these is methionine oxidation, which increases to a maximum of 40% of all Met-containing peptides, compared with 2–5% with iodoacetamide. Increases were also observed for mono- and dioxidized tryptophan. No additional differences between the alkylating reagents were observed for a range of other post-translational modifications and digestion parameters. The deleterious effects were observed for 2-chloroacetamide from three separate suppliers. The adverse impact of 2-chloroacetamide on methionine oxidation suggests that it is not the ideal alkylating reagent for proteomics.

Cite this collection

Hains, Peter G.; Robinson, Phillip J. (2018): The Impact of

Commonly Used Alkylating Agents on Artifactual

Peptide Modification. ACS Publications. Collection.