Supplementary material from "Sperm competition as an under-appreciated factor in domestication"

Published on 2018-03-13T05:43:45Z (GMT) by
Humans created an environment that increased selective pressures on subgroups of those species that became domestic. We propose that the domestication process may in some cases have been facilitated by changes in mating behaviour and resultant sperm competition. By adapting to sperm competition, proto-domestic animals could potentially have outcompeted their wild counterparts in human-constructed niches. This could have contributed to the restriction of gene flow between the proto-domesticates and their wild counterparts, thereby promoting the fixation of other domestication characteristics. Further to this novel perspective for domestication, we emphasize the general potential of postcopulatory sexual selection in the restriction of gene flow between populations, and urge more studies.

Cite this collection

Hulme-Beaman, Ardern; B. Searle, Jeremy; Stockley, Paula (2018): Supplementary material from "Sperm competition as an under-appreciated factor in domestication". The Royal Society. Collection.