Supplementary material from "Pedigree-based inbreeding coefficient explains more variation in fitness than heterozygosity at 160 microsatellites in a wild bird population"

Published on 2017-02-25T04:51:08Z (GMT) by
Although the pedigree-based inbreeding coefficient <i>F</i> predicts the <i>expected</i> proportion of an individual's genome that is identical-by-descent (IBD), heterozygosity at genetic markers captures Mendelian sampling variation and thereby provides an estimate of <i>realized</i> IBD. Realized IBD should hence explain more variation in fitness than their pedigree-based expectations, but how many markers are required to achieve this in practice remains poorly understood. We use extensive pedigree and life-history data from an island population of song sparrows (<i>Melospiza melodia</i>) to show that the number of genetic markers and pedigree depth affected the explanatory power of heterozygosity and <i>F</i>, respectively, but that heterozygosity measured at 160 microsatellites did not explain more variation in fitness than <i>F</i>. This is in contrast with other studies, that found heterozygosity based on far fewer markers to explain more variation in fitness than <i>F</i>. Thus, the relative performance of marker- and pedigree-based estimates of IBD depends on the quality of the pedigree, the number, variability and location of the markers employed, and the species-specific recombination landscape, and expectations based on detailed and deep pedigrees remain valuable until we can routinely afford genotyping hundreds of phenotyped wild individuals of genetic non-model species for thousands of genetic markers.

Cite this collection

Nietlisbach, Pirmin; Keller, Lukas F.; Camenisch, Glauco; Guillaume, Frédéric; Arcese, Peter; M. Reid, Jane; Postma, Erik (2017): Supplementary material from "Pedigree-based inbreeding coefficient explains more variation in fitness than heterozygosity at 160 microsatellites in a wild bird population". The Royal Society.