Supplementary material from "Extinction risk in extant marine species integrating palaeontological and biodistributional data"

Published on 2018-09-12T14:10:54Z (GMT) by
Extinction risk assessments of marine invertebrate species remain scarce, which hinders effective management of marine biodiversity in the face of anthropogenic impacts. To help close this information gap, in this paper we provide a metric of relative extinction risk that combines palaeontological data, in the form of extinction rates calculated from the fossil record, with two known correlates of risk in the modern day: geographical range size and realized thermal niche. We test the performance of this metric—Palaeontological Extinction Risk In Lineages(PERIL)—using survivorship analyses of Pliocene bivalve faunas from California and New Zealand, and then use it to identify present-day hotspots of extinction vulnerability for extant shallow-marine Bivalvia. Areas of the ocean where concentrations of bivalve species with higher PERIL scores overlap with high levels of climatic or anthropogenic stressors should be considered of most immediate concern for both conservation and management.

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Collins, K. S.; Edie, S. M.; Hunt, G.; Roy, K.; Jablonski, D. (2018): Supplementary material from "Extinction risk in extant marine species integrating palaeontological and biodistributional data". The Royal Society. Collection.