State Networks and Intra-Ethnic Group Variation in the 2011 Syrian Uprising

Published on 2018-10-30T12:00:00Z (GMT) by
<div><p>The 2011 Syrian uprising looks, from afar, like a paradigmatic example of ethnically exclusive rule giving way to civil war. The ruling regime is drawn almost exclusively from the Alawi minority, and the challengers were drawn heavily from the Sunni majority. But many Sunnis remained quiescent or actively supported the regime. This article argues that variation in revolutionary participation among members of an excluded ethnic group is best explained in terms of the networks states construct across ethnic boundaries. It identifies several forms of linkage that regimes can develop with their subject populations and relates them to variations in local social structure. Drawing on an original data set of ethnic identity and challenge events in the Syrian uprising, the article quantitatively tests the state networks hypothesis. Its findings suggest that the mechanisms commonly associated with ethnic identity and “ethnic exclusion” frequently operate upon social boundaries below the ethnic group level.</p></div>

Cite this collection

Mazur, Kevin (2018): State Networks and Intra-Ethnic Group Variation in the 2011 Syrian Uprising. SAGE Journals. Collection.