Physico-Chemical Characterization of Fine and Ultrafine Particles Emitted during Diesel Particulate Filter Active Regeneration of Euro5 Diesel Vehicles

Published on 2018-02-12T20:20:50Z (GMT) by
Diesel particulate filters (DPFs) are commonly employed in modern passenger cars to comply with current particulate matter (PM) emission standards. DPFs requires periodic regeneration to remove the accumulated matter. During the process, high-concentration particles, in both nucleation and accumulation modes, are emitted. Here, we report new information on particle morphology and chemical composition of fine (FPs) and ultrafine particles (UFPs) measured downstream of the DPF during active regeneration of two Euro 5 passenger cars. The first vehicle was equipped with a close-coupled diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and noncatalyzed DPF combined with fuel borne catalyst and the second one with DOC and a catalyzed-diesel particle filter (CDPF). Differences in PM emission profiles of the two vehicles were related to different after treatment design, regeneration strategies, and vehicle characteristics and mileage. Particles in the nucleation mode consisted of ammonium bisulfate, sulfate and sulfuric acid, suggesting that the catalyst desulfation is the key process in the formation of UFPs. Larger particles and agglomerates, ranging from 90 to 600 nm, consisted of carbonaceous material (soot and soot aggregates) coated by condensable material including organics, ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid. Particle emission in the accumulation mode was due to the reduced filtration efficiency (soot cake oxidation) throughout the regeneration process.

Cite this collection

R’Mili, Badr; Boréave, Antoinette; Meme, Aurelie; Vernoux, Philippe; Leblanc, Mickael; Noël, Ludovic; et al. (2018): Physico-Chemical

Characterization of Fine and Ultrafine

Particles Emitted during Diesel Particulate Filter Active Regeneration

of Euro5 Diesel Vehicles. ACS Publications. Collection.