Exploring the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of health care professionals on viral hepatitis notification in Gauteng, South Africa, 2015

Published on 2018-12-06T05:00:00Z (GMT) by
Abstract Background Data on viral hepatitis in South Africa is scarce. Although viral hepatitis A, B and C are notifiable conditions in South Africa, discrepancies have been noted in the number of viral hepatitis cases notified by the National Department of Health (NDOH) compared with laboratory confirmed cases from the National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD). The aim of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of health care professionals on the notification of viral hepatitis A, B and C. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study on 385 health care professionals was conducted at Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic and Tshwane District hospitals in Gauteng province, South Africa, between March and May 2015. A pre-tested, structured questionnaire with 21 (6 demographic and 15 knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP)) questions was used to collect information from invited participants. A score was assigned to each KAP question and a mean (SD) score was calculated for each section. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics in STATA version 13. Results Of the total 385 respondents, 65% (n = 250) were nurses and 35% (n = 135) were doctors. The overall mean knowledge score for health care professionals was 2.0 ± 1.6 (mean ± SD) out of a score of 6 regarding viral hepatitis notification. Overall mean scores of practice and attitude towards notification were higher at 2.9 ± 0.4 and 3.3 ± 0.7, out of a score of 4 and 5, respectively. Lack of training, poor knowledge, a complex process and excessive workload were some of the reasons for poor notification of viral hepatitis. Conclusions Overall, knowledge on notification of viral hepatitis was poor among health care professionals. Adequate training on viral hepatitis, notification process, roles and responsibilities of health care professionals to notify and the implication of viral hepatitis notifications is recommended to improve reporting rate of notifiable diseases and referrals to increase linkage to care.

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Mathatha, Eva; Manamela, Jack; Musekiwa, Alfred; Prabdial-Sing, Nishi (2018): Exploring the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of health care professionals on viral hepatitis notification in Gauteng, South Africa, 2015. figshare. Collection.