Le et al 2015 Video perspectives poster ISMPP 11AM April2015.pdf (472.44 kB)

Video Abstracts: Do the Metrics Stack up?

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posted on 03.11.2015, 17:02 by Sandra Lê, Tom Rees, Natalie Dennis, Sarah Petit, Angela Jones, Sheelah Smith

Objective: Video abstracts offer a means to present results that complement the full paper. We aimed to compare video abstract views with other publication metrics in order to understand better the role they play in disseminating research findings.
Research design and methods: Metrics were obtained from YouTube for all video abstracts published by the open-access publisher, Dove Medical Press. All articles with video abstracts published in four journals in different therapy areas over the period February 27, 2014, to March 19, 2015, were analyzed (average time since publication: 212 days), and compared with
metrics for matched articles without video abstracts.
Results: A total of 31 articles with video abstracts were identified. Average number of views per video was 364; most views came from United States, India, and United Kingdom. Males were 66% of viewers and 36% were aged 25–34 years. In our sample, video abstracts did not increase with time.
Video views were weakly correlated with text abstract views (r-squared = 0.22) and with full paper views (r2 = 0.23) with around 1.5 video views per full paper view. Full views of papers with a video abstract were similar to those of papers without.
Conclusions: Video abstracts are of interest to many authors and readers and complement full views. This is in line with authors’ and publication professionals’ views that publishing a video abstract increases the reach of research results and may increase downloads.


Abstract published as:


Video abstracts: do the metrics stack up?

T Rees, S Le, L Prevost, S Smith
CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION 31, S18-S18

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1185/03007995.2016.1152850

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