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Video_1_CT-Based Simulation of Left Ventricular Hemodynamics: A Pilot Study in Mitral Regurgitation and Left Ventricle Aneurysm Patients.MP4 (2.67 MB)

Video_1_CT-Based Simulation of Left Ventricular Hemodynamics: A Pilot Study in Mitral Regurgitation and Left Ventricle Aneurysm Patients.MP4

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posted on 2022-03-22, 05:03 authored by Lukas Obermeier, Katharina Vellguth, Adriano Schlief, Lennart Tautz, Jan Bruening, Christoph Knosalla, Titus Kuehne, Natalia Solowjowa, Leonid Goubergrits
Background

Cardiac CT (CCT) is well suited for a detailed analysis of heart structures due to its high spatial resolution, but in contrast to MRI and echocardiography, CCT does not allow an assessment of intracardiac flow. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can complement this shortcoming. It enables the computation of hemodynamics at a high spatio-temporal resolution based on medical images. The aim of this proposed study is to establish a CCT-based CFD methodology for the analysis of left ventricle (LV) hemodynamics and to assess the usability of the computational framework for clinical practice.

Materials and Methods

The methodology is demonstrated by means of four cases selected from a cohort of 125 multiphase CCT examinations of heart failure patients. These cases represent subcohorts of patients with and without LV aneurysm and with severe and no mitral regurgitation (MR). All selected LVs are dilated and characterized by a reduced ejection fraction (EF). End-diastolic and end-systolic image data was used to reconstruct LV geometries with 2D valves as well as the ventricular movement. The intraventricular hemodynamics were computed with a prescribed-motion CFD approach and evaluated in terms of large-scale flow patterns, energetic behavior, and intraventricular washout.

Results

In the MR patients, a disrupted E-wave jet, a fragmentary diastolic vortex formation and an increased specific energy dissipation in systole are observed. In all cases, regions with an impaired washout are visible. The results furthermore indicate that considering several cycles might provide a more detailed view of the washout process. The pre-processing times and computational expenses are in reach of clinical feasibility.

Conclusion

The proposed CCT-based CFD method allows to compute patient-specific intraventricular hemodynamics and thus complements the informative value of CCT. The method can be applied to any CCT data of common quality and represents a fair balance between model accuracy and overall expenses. With further model enhancements, the computational framework has the potential to be embedded in clinical routine workflows, to support clinical decision making and treatment planning.

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