Cognition and Flow Quant JAD revised final 080221.docx (3.99 MB)
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The Cognition and Flow Study: A Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effects of Cognitive Training on Cerebral Blood Flow.

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journal contribution
posted on 20.04.2021, 15:22 by Lucy C Beishon, Ronney B Panerai, Charley Budgeon, Hari Subramaniam, Elizabeta Mukaetova-Ladinska, Thompson G Robinson, Victoria J Haunton

Background

Cognitive training (CT) has demonstrated benefits for healthy older adults (HG) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), but the effects on vascular function are unknown.

Objective

This is a feasibility trial investigating the effects of CT on cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv).

Methods

Twenty HG, 24 with Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 12 with MCI were randomized to 12 weeks of multi-domain CT or control. Outcomes included: cognition (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination III), mood, quality of life (QoL), physical, and neurovascular function (transcranial Doppler ultrasonography measured task activation of CBFv responses). Data are presented as mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CI).

Results

47 participants completed the trial. There were three dropouts from the training arm in the AD group, and one in the HG group. The intervention was acceptable and feasible to the majority of participants with a high completion rate (89%). The dropout rate was higher among participants with dementia. Few changes were identified on secondary analyses, but QoL was significantly improved in HG post-training (MD: 4.83 [95% CI: 1.13, 8.54]). CBFv response rate was not significantly different in HG (MD: 1.84 [95% CI: -4.81, 1.12]), but a significant increase was seen in the patient group (MD: 1.79 [95% CI: 0.005, 3.58]), requiring sample sizes of 56 and 84 participants respectively for a fully-powered trial.

Conclusion

A 12-week CT program was acceptable and feasible in HG, AD, and MCI. CT may be associated with alterations in vascular physiology which require further investigation in an appropriately powered randomized controlled trial.

History

Author affiliation

Department of Cardiovascular Sciences

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

Journal of Alzheimer's disease : JAD

Publisher

IOS Press

issn

1387-2877

eissn

1875-8908

Acceptance date

08/02/2021

Copyright date

2021

Available date

20/04/2021

Spatial coverage

Netherlands

Language

eng