rsob160250_si_001.pdf (150.38 kB)

Supplementary figure and table from Diverse integrin adhesion stoichiometries caused by varied actomyosin activity

Download (150.38 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 10.04.2017, 10:00 by Natalia A. Bulgakova, Jutta Wellmann, Nicholas H. Brown
Cells in an organism are subjected to numerous sources of external and internal forces, and are able to sense and respond to these forces. Integrin-mediated adhesion links the extracellular matrix outside cells to the cytoskeleton inside, and participates in sensing, transmitting and responding to forces. While integrin adhesion rapidly adapts to changes in forces in isolated migrating cells, it is not known whether similar or more complex responses occur within intact, developing tissues. Here, we studied changes in integrin adhesion composition upon different contractility conditions in Drosophila embryonic muscles. We discovered that all integrin adhesion components tested were still present at muscle attachment sites (MASs) when either cytoplasmic or muscle myosin II was genetically removed, suggesting a primary role of a developmental programme in the initial assembly of integrin adhesions. Contractility does, however, increase the levels of integrin adhesion components, suggesting a mechanism to balance the strength of muscle attachment to the force of muscle contraction. Perturbing contractility in distinct ways, by genetic removal of either cytoplasmic or muscle myosin II or eliminating muscle innervation, each caused unique alterations to the stoichiometry at MASs. This suggests that different integrin-associated proteins are added to counteract different kinds of force increase.

History

Licence

Exports

Logo branding

Licence

Exports