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Preventing EMS workplace violence: A mixed-methods analysis of insights from assaulted medics

journal contribution
posted on 21.03.2019, 00:00 by Brian MaguireBrian Maguire, Barbara O'NeillBarbara O'Neill, P O'Meara, Matthew BrowneMatthew Browne, MT Dealy
Objective: To describe measures that assaulted EMS personnel believe will help prevent violence against EMS personnel. Methods: This mixed- methods study includes a thematic analysis and directed content analysis of one survey question that asked the victims of workplace violence how the incident might have been prevented. Results: Of 1778 survey respondents, 633 reported being assaulted in the previous 12 months; 203 of them believed the incident could have been prevented and 193 of them (95%) answered this question. Six themes were identified using Haddon's Matrix as a framework. The themes included: Human factors, including specialized training related to specific populations and de-escalation techniques as well as improved situational awareness; Equipment factors, such as restraint equipment and resources; and, Operational and environment factors, including advanced warning systems. Persons who could have prevented the violence were identified as police, self, other professionals, partners and dispatchers. Restraints and training were suggested as violence-prevention tools and methods Conclusions: This is the first international study from the perspective of victimized EMS personnel, to report on ways that violence could be prevented. Ambulance agencies should consider these suggestions and work with researchers to evaluate risks at the agency level and to develop, implement and test interventions to reduce the risks of violence against EMS personnel. These teams should work together to both form an evidence-base for prevention and to publish findings so that EMS medical directors, administrators and professionals around the world can learn from each experience. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd

History

Volume

49

Issue

7

Start Page

1258

End Page

1265

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1879-0267

ISSN

0020-1383

Publisher

Elsevier, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

La Trobe University; New York University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Injury