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Integration of Indigenous Knowledges in clinical, laboratory, and other science settings_A protocol for a scoping review.pdf (213.18 kB)

Integration of Indigenous Knowledges in clinical, laboratory, and other science settings: A protocol for a scoping review

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Version 2 2021-10-08, 00:58
Version 1 2021-10-08, 00:08
journal contribution
posted on 2021-10-08, 00:58 authored by Courtney Ryder, Pip HendersonPip Henderson, Roland Wilson, Jacqueline StephensJacqueline Stephens

This project stems from concern that graduating students, specifically those of the dominant culture, have limited understanding about knowledge system concepts let alone those that inform their practices. Failure to recognise that multiple knowledge systems exist can reinforce dominant, colonial practices and perspectives. This scoping review protocol has been developed to identify valuable examples of where and how western and Indigenous knowledge systems have been integrated in various clinical and education settings to provide an evidence-base about what works and to inform the development of workshops to develop their understandings of knowledge systems. This review uses PRISMA-ScR guidelines, the JBI Manual for Evidence Synthesis, and applies decolonising lens by deliberate privileging of Indigenous knowledges and perspectives, devolution of traditional power hierarchies within research teams, authentic engagement of team members from diversity standpoints and worldviews, and relationality considerations throughout. A systematic search of Web of Science, ProQuest, Medline, Scopus, and Google Scholar will locate peer-reviewed published literature as well as grey literature. Hand searching according to team members’ knowledge and pearling methods will also be utilised. Search terms have been collaboratively developed through research topic team yarning, drawing on extant knowledge, group mind-mapping, and from preliminary readings. Pilot testing will be conducted by two team members to test the appropriateness of search syntaxes, and eligibility criteria will be applied according to title and abstracts. These results will be provided to all team members, who through research yarning, will refine source selection processes prior to full text searches. Articles will be managed through Covidence. Final text searches will be undertaken by two team members who will chart the data for all located articles and provide these to the full team for further yarning and group consensus. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Quality Appraisal Tool will also be utilised to ascertain the extent to which the located studies align with cultural protocols and ethical conduct for research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Findings will be collaboratively agreed and presented in accessible formats. The scoping review will provide a narrative synthesis of where and how western and Indigenous knowledges are integrated and jointly utilised in clinical and education settings. This will identify important characteristics which will inform the development of workshops. The scoping review will provide a narrative synthesis of where and how western and indigenous knowledges are integrated and jointly utilised in clinical and education settings. This will identify important characteristics which will inform the development of workshops.


Funding

This study is supported by an Educational Uplift Grant through the College of Medicine and Public Health, Flinders University.

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