jp049531q_si_001.pdf (89.01 kB)
Download file

Copper-Mediated Peptide Radical Ions in the Gas Phase

Download (89.01 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 29.07.2004, 00:00 authored by Elham Bagheri-Majdi, Yuyong Ke, Galina Orlova, Ivan K. Chu, Alan C. Hopkinson, K. W. Michael Siu
Molecular radical cations, M•+, of amino acids and oligopeptides are produced by collision-induced dissociation of mixed complex ions, [CuII(dien)M]•2+, that contain CuII, an amine, typically diethylenetriamine (dien), and the oligopeptide, M. With dien as the amine ligand, abundant M•+ formation is observed only for the amino acids tryptophan and tyrosine, and oligopeptides that contain either the tryptophanyl or tyrosyl residue. Dissociation of the M•+ ion is rich and differs considerably from that of protonated amino acids and peptides. Facile fragmentation occurs around the α-carbon of the tryptophanyl residue. Cleavage of the N−Cα bond and proton transfer from the exocyclic methylene group in the side chain to the N-terminal residue results in formation of the [zn − H]•+ ion and elimination of the N-terminal fragment as ammonia or an amide, depending on the position of the tryptophanyl residue. Cleavage of the Cα−C bond of an oligopeptide containing a C-terminal tryptophan residue and proton transfer from the carboxylic group to the N-terminal fragment (a carbonyl oxygen atom) results in formation of the [an + H]•+ ion and elimination of carbon dioxide. Both types of fragmentation have no analogous reactions in protonated peptides. For the M•+ of tryptophanylglycylglycine, WGG, elimination of the tryptophanyl side chain results in GGG•+. This radical cation fragments by eliminating its C-terminal glycine to give the [b2 − H]•+ ion, which is an oxazolone and shares much of the structure and reactivity of the b2+ ion from protonated triglycine. Density functional theory shows the mechanism of forming the [b2 − H]•+ ion is similar to that of the b2+ ion, although the free-energy barrier at 29.4 kcal/mol is lower. The [b2 − H]•+ ion eliminates CO readily to give the [a2 − H]•+ ion, which is an iminium radical ion.

History