Image_1_Monosexual Cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum Infection Protects Against DSS-Induced Colitis by Shifting the Th1/Th2 Balance and Modulating th.TIF (259.97 kB)
Download file

Image_1_Monosexual Cercariae of Schistosoma japonicum Infection Protects Against DSS-Induced Colitis by Shifting the Th1/Th2 Balance and Modulating the Gut Microbiota.TIF

Download (259.97 kB)
figure
posted on 05.01.2021, 04:06 by Hongli Zhou, Xiaojing Zeng, Dongchen Sun, Zhe Chen, Weixin Chen, Liwei Fan, Yanin Limpanont, Paron Dekumyoy, Wanchai Maleewong, Zhiyue Lv

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related inflammation is closely associated with the initiation and progression of colorectal cancer. IBD is generally treated with 5-aminosalicylic acid and immune-modulating medication, but side effects and limitations of these therapies are emerging. Thus, the development of novel preventative or therapeutic approaches is imperative. Here, we constructed a dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced IBD mouse model that was infected with monosexual Schistosoma japonicum cercariae (mSjci) at day 1 or administered dexamethasone (DXM) from days 3 to 5 as a positive control. The protective effect of mSjci on IBD mice was evaluated through their assessments of their clinical signs, histopathological lesions and intestinal permeability. To uncover the underlying mechanism, the Th1/Th2 balance and Treg cell population were also examined. Additionally, the alterations in the gut microbiota were assessed to investigate the interaction between the mSjci-modulated immune response and pathogenic microbiome. Mice treated with DSS and mSjci showed fewer IBD clinical signs and less impaired intestinal permeability than DSS-treated mice. Mechanistically, mSjci modulated the Th1/Th2 balance by repressing IFN-γ production, promoting IL-10 expression and enhancing the Treg subset population. Moreover, mSjci notably reshaped the structure, diversity and richness of the gut microbiota community and subsequently exerted immune-modulating effects. Our findings provide evidence showing that mSjci might serve as a novel and effective protective strategy and that the gut microbiota might be a new therapeutic target in IBD.

History

References