Table_2_Identification of Implications of Angiogenesis and m6A Modification on Immunosuppression and Therapeutic Sensitivity in Low-Grade Glioma by Ne.docx (22.46 kB)
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Table_2_Identification of Implications of Angiogenesis and m6A Modification on Immunosuppression and Therapeutic Sensitivity in Low-Grade Glioma by Network Computational Analysis of Subtypes and Signatures.docx

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posted on 27.04.2022, 10:55 by Bo Li, Fang Wang, Nan Wang, Kuiyuan Hou, Jianyang Du

Angiogenesis is a complex process in the immunosuppressed low-grade gliomas (LGG) microenvironment and is regulated by multiple factors. N6-methyladenosine (m6A), modified by the m6A modification regulators (“writers” “readers” and “erasers”), can drive LGG formation. In the hypoxic environment of intracranial tumor immune microenvironment (TIME), m6A modifications in glioma stem cells are predominantly distributed around neovascularization and synergize with complex perivascular pathological ecology to mediate the immunosuppressive phenotype of TIME. The exact mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. Herein, we elucidated the relevance of the angiogenesis-related genes (ARGs) and m6A regulators (MAGs) and their influencing mechanism from a macro perspective. Based on the expression pattern of MAGs, we divided patients with LGG into two robust categories via consensus clustering, and further annotated the malignant related mechanisms and corresponding targeted agents. The two subgroups (CL1, CL2) demonstrated a significant correlation with prognosis and clinical-pathology features. Moreover, WGCNA has also uncovered the hub genes and related mechanisms of MAGs affecting clinical characters. Clustering analysis revealed a synergistic promoting effect of M6A and angiogenesis on immunosuppression. Based on the expression patterns of MAGs, we established a high-performance gene-signature (MASig). MASig revealed somatic mutational mechanisms by which MAGs affect the sensitivity to treatment in LGG patients. In conclusion, the MAGs were critical participants in the malignant process of LGG, with a vital potential in the prognosis stratification, prediction of outcome, and therapeutic sensitivity of LGG. Findings based on these strategies may facilitate the development of objective diagnosis and treatment systems to quantify patient survival and other outcomes, and in some cases, to identify potential unexplored targeted therapies.

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