Table_1_What Impact Does Accreditation Have on Workplaces? A Qualitative Study to Explore the Perceptions of Healthcare Professionals About the Proces.docx (660.56 kB)
Download file

Table_1_What Impact Does Accreditation Have on Workplaces? A Qualitative Study to Explore the Perceptions of Healthcare Professionals About the Process of Accreditation.docx

Download (660.56 kB)
dataset
posted on 10.07.2020, 04:14 by Amna I. Alshamsi, Louise Thomson, Angeli Santos
Aim

This study seeks to explore the emerging psychosocial risks of healthcare accreditation in workplaces and understand healthcare professionals’ (HCPs) perceptions of work demands and the unexpected consequences such accreditation has created for them.

Methods

Twenty-seven semi-structured interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with a variety of HCPs, including doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and allied health professionals. The study was conducted in three public hospitals and a network of primary healthcare centers in the United Arab Emirates. Interviews and focus group discussions were transcribed and analyzed using a theoretical thematic analysis approach.

Results

The results showed that a number of psychosocial risks were prevalent during the course of accreditation. HCPs faced increased work demands during such a process, including increased working hours, increased working pace, perceived time pressure, and conflicting information. Such demands were perceived to influence not only their health but also their families as well as patients’ care. In contrast, teamwork and coworker support were vital to mitigate the effect of such demands.

Implications

This study identified emerging risks during the process of accreditation. The findings show that the process of accreditation increases work-related risks before the inspection visit. These findings have significant implications for understanding how accreditation processes increase psychosocial risks; they also consolidate the idea that appropriate systems and support for HCPs should be a priority when planning for accreditation.

History