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Data_Sheet_3_Selection Signatures of Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Revealed by Whole-Genome Resequencing Analysis.XLSX (281.96 kB)

Data_Sheet_3_Selection Signatures of Pacific White Shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei Revealed by Whole-Genome Resequencing Analysis.XLSX

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posted on 2022-03-24, 06:35 authored by Hao Wang, Mingxuan Teng, Pingping Liu, Mingyang Zhao, Shi Wang, Jingjie Hu, Zhenmin Bao, Qifan Zeng

The Pacific white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei is among the top aquatic species of commercial importance around the world. Over the last four decades, the breeding works of L. vannamei have been carried out intensively and have generated multiple strains with improved production and performance traits. However, signatures of domestication and artificial selection across the L. vannamei genome remain largely unexplored. In the present study, we conducted whole genomic resequencing of 180 Pacific white shrimps from two artificially selective breeds and four market-leading companies. A total of 37 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified with an average density of 22.5 SNPs/Kb across the genome. Ancestry estimation, principal component analysis, and phylogenetic inference have all revealed the obvious stratifications among the six breeds. We evaluated the linkage disequilibrium (LD) decay in each breed and identified the genetic variations driven by selection. Pairwise comparison of the fixation index (Fst) and nucleotide diversity (θπ) has allowed for mining the genomic regions under selective sweep in each breed. The functional enrichment analysis revealed that genes within these regions are mainly involved in the cellular macromolecule metabolic process, proteolysis, structural molecule activity, structure of the constituent ribosome, and responses to stimulus. The genome-wide SNP datasets provide valuable information for germplasm resources assessment and genome-assisted breeding of Pacific white shrimps, and also shed light on the genetic effects and genomic signatures of selective breeding.

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