Data_Sheet_1_Disrupted Brain Connectivity Networks in Aphasia Revealed by Resting-State fMRI.docx (41.89 kB)
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Data_Sheet_1_Disrupted Brain Connectivity Networks in Aphasia Revealed by Resting-State fMRI.docx

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posted on 20.10.2021, 13:31 by Xiaoyun Chen, Liting Chen, Senning Zheng, Hong Wang, Yanhong Dai, Zhuoming Chen, Ruiwang Huang

Aphasia is characterized by the disability of spontaneous conversation, listening, understanding, retelling, naming, reading, or writing. However, the neural mechanisms of language damage after stroke are still under discussion. This study aimed to investigate the global and nodal characterization of the functional networks in patients with aphasic stroke based on resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). Twenty-four right-handed patients with aphasia after stroke and 19 healthy controls (HC) underwent a 3-TfMRI scan. A whole-brain large-scale functional connectivity network was then constructed based on Power's atlas of 264 functional regions of interest, and the global and nodal topological properties of these networks were analyzed using graph theory approaches. The results showed that patients with aphasia had decreased in small-worldness (sigma), normalized clustering coefficient (gamma), and local efficiency (Eloc) values. Furthermore, Eloc was positively correlated with language ability, retelling, naming, and listening comprehension in patients with aphasia. Patients with aphasia also had decreased nodal degree and decreased nodal efficiency in the left postcentral gyrus, central opercular cortex, and insular cortex. Our results suggest that the global and local topology attributes were altered by injury in patients with aphasic stroke. We argue that the local efficiency of brain networks might be used as a potential indicator of basic speech function in patients with aphasia.

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