2018 - Ballatore DeSabbata - Crowdsourced Geographies London.pdf (5.94 MB)
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Charting the geographies of crowdsourced information in Greater London

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conference contribution
posted on 29.05.2018, 09:17 by Andrea Ballatore, Stefano De Sabbata
Crowdsourcing platforms and social media produce distinctive geographies of informational content. The production process is enabled and influenced by a variety of socio-economic and demographic factors, shaping the place representation, i.e., the amount and type of information available in an area. In this study, we explore and explain the geographies of Twitter and Wikipedia in Greater London, highlighting the relationships between the crowdsourced data and the local geo-demographic characteristics of the areas where they are located. Through a set of robust regression models on a sample of 1.6M tweets and about 22,000 Wikipedia articles, we identify level of education, presence of people aged 30–44, and property prices as the most important explanatory factors for place representation at the urban scale. To some extent, this confirms the received knowledge of such data being created primarily by relatively wealthy, young, and educated users. However, about half of the variability is left unexplained, suggesting that a broader inclusion of potential factors is necessary.

History

Citation

The 21st Annual International Conference on Geographic Information Science AGILE 2018: Geospatial Technologies for All, 2018, pp. 149-168

Author affiliation

/Organisation/COLLEGE OF SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING/School of Geography, Geology and the Environment

Source

The 21st Annual International Conference on Geographic Information Science AGILE 2018: Geospatial Technologies for All, Lund, Sweden

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Published in

The 21st Annual International Conference on Geographic Information Science AGILE 2018: Geospatial Technologies for All

Publisher

Springer International Publishing AG

isbn

978-3-319-78207-2;978-3-319-78208-9

Acceptance date

08/02/2018

Copyright date

2018

Available date

24/03/2019

Publisher version

https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-78208-9_8

Notes

The demographic data used in this work have been provided by the Greater London Authority and Nomis under the Open Government Licence v2.0. The content analysed in this article was produced by Twitter users and Wikipedia contributors, and obtained through the web services by Twitter, Inc. and Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., under the respective licences. The maps contain data from CDRC LOAC Geodata Pack by the ESRC Consumer Data Research Centre; National Statistics data Crown copyright and database right 2015; Ordnance Survey data Crown copyright and database right 2015.;The file associated with this record is under embargo until 12 months after publication, in accordance with the publisher's self-archiving policy. The full text may be available through the publisher links provided above.

Book series

Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography book series (LNGC);

Temporal coverage: start date

12/06/2018

Temporal coverage: end date

15/06/2018

Language

en