Relationship between acceleration, deceleration and theta amplitude.

<p><b>A</b>: two-dimensional histograms for the relationship between deceleration and theta amplitude, with corresponding filtered theta, speed and acceleration traces for simultaneously recorded CA1 electrodes. All theta envelope units = ×10<sup>−4</sup>; all count units = ×10<sup>3</sup>. <b>B</b>: Electrodes were grouped according to septotemporal position. Mean partial correlation coefficients (controlling for speed) are shown for the relationship between deceleration (blue bar) and theta amplitude as well as for acceleration (red bar) and theta amplitude for CA1. As can be seen, when acceleration is separated into its positive and negative constituents, a differential relationship emerges such that deceleration is more predictive of theta amplitude as compared to acceleration. Theta amplitude was significantly modulated by both acceleration and deceleration across the entirety of the hippocampus for CA1. Additionally, deceleration explained more of the variability in theta amplitude across the entirety of CA1 axis. <b>C</b>: Partial correlation coefficients for the relationship between deceleration and theta amplitude (blue circles) and acceleration and theta amplitude (red circles) as a function of distance from the septal pole for CA1. Each dot represents the partial correlation coefficient between each index (acceleration, deceleration) and theta amplitude plotted as a function of distance from the septal pole. The relationship between deceleration and theta amplitude decreased across the septotemporal axis of CA1. <b>D</b>: Same as A, but for DG. Theta amplitude was significantly modulated by both acceleration and deceleration at septal and midseptotemporal DG sites. Further, deceleration explained more of the variability in theta amplitude than acceleration at DG sites.</p>