Age-Related Loss of Lumbar Spinal Lordosis and Mobility <i>– - Figure 3 </i> A Study of 323 Asymptomatic Volunteers

<p>Mean values of the segmental lordosis for the Epionics segments S1 to S6 in all investigated age groups (<b>A</b>). Males (above) and females (below) are shown separately. Error bars represent the standard deviation. (<b>B</b>): Absolute change in segmental lordosis for the Epionics segments S1 to S6 in all investigated age groups in relation to the youngest cohort (20–29 yrs) for males (above) and females (below) separately. The youngest cohort is normalised to ‘zero’ as a reference. The red area highlights the pattern of the absolute change between the oldest and youngest cohorts. (<b>C</b>): Relative change in segmental lordosis for the Epionics segments S1 to S6 between the oldest and youngest age groups for males (above) and females (below) separately. The youngest cohort is normalised to 100% as a reference. Values indicate the percentage of lordosis that the oldest cohort possesses in relation to the youngest cohort. The red area highlights the pattern of the relative changes between the oldest and youngest cohorts.</p>