That doesn’t look like I thought it would’: A study into the effectiveness of picture book cataloguing at the University of Canterbury Library

2018-08-15T20:57:59Z (GMT) by Rosamund Feeney
This study explores the topic of whether or not library catalogues are meeting the needs of different
user groups. This was narrowed down to focus on early childhood teaching students at the University
of Canterbury and how they select picture books using the University's library catalogue. In doing
so it identifies what metadata this group look for when selecting an item and found that these are
not reflected in the current catalogue. This took a qualitative approach which combined structured
interviews with the verbal protocol analysis method in a three-part approach. Participants were
asked a series of questions during the first and second parts, then asked to think out loud as they
selecting items during the second stage. Throughout this process no prompts were provided from
the researcher in an attempt to capture their natural thoughts. Data collected showed that early
childhood teaching students have specific needs when selecting picture books which impacts the type
of metadata they are drawn to. These are a result for the need to find books which entertain and
engage young children while aligning with the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum. It was found
that these needs were not reflected in current picture book records at the University of Canterbury
which creates challenges when selecting items. Understanding the behavior of this user group can
help to inform cataloguers at the University of Canterbury to create or edit records to improve the
selection process. On a wider level, there is the potential to explore this topic in future studies to
support libraries in creating systems which reflect the needs of their users.ING_