Supplementary Material for: The Organization of Repetitive DNA in the Genomes of Amazonian Lizard Species in the Family Teiidae

<p>Repetitive DNA is the largest fraction of the eukaryote genome and comprises tandem and dispersed sequences. It presents variations in relation to its composition, number of copies, distribution, dynamics, and genome organization, and participates in the evolutionary diversification of different vertebrate species. Repetitive sequences are usually located in the heterochromatin of centromeric and telomeric regions of chromosomes, contributing to chromosomal structures. Therefore, the aim of this study was to physically map repetitive DNA sequences (5S rDNA, telomeric sequences, tropomyosin gene 1, and retroelements <i>Rex</i><i>1</i> and <i>SINE</i>) of mitotic chromosomes of Amazonian species of teiids <i>(Ameiva ameiva</i>, <i>Cnemidophorus </i>sp. 1, <i>Kentropyx calcarata</i>, <i>Kentropyx pelviceps,</i> and <i>Tupinambis teguixin)</i> to understand their genome organization and karyotype evolution. The mapping of repetitive sequences revealed a distinct pattern in <i>Cnemidophorus</i> sp. 1, whereas the other species showed all sequences interspersed in the heterochromatic region. Physical mapping of the tropomyosin 1 gene was performed for the first time in lizards and showed that in addition to being functional, this gene has a structural function similar to the mapped repetitive elements as it is located preferentially in centromeric regions and termini of chromosomes.</p>