Supplementary Material for: Micropapular Cutaneous Sarcoidosis Reviewed

<b><i>Background:</i></b> Micropapular cutaneous sarcoidosis (MPCS) is a rare variant of sarcoidosis. Herein we review the literature and include a recent case of MPCS discussing pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. <b><i>Method:</i></b> A review was conducted using the terms “micropapular sarcoidosis” and “micropapular sarcoid.” A recent case of a 50-year-old male patient with biopsy-identified MPCS was also included in the review. <b><i>Results:</i></b> In total, 12 cases with an aggregate of 18 patients were included in the review. Presentation among all patients was consistent, with scattered, occasionally pruritic, faintly erythematous shiny white papules. Skin biopsy demonstrated noncaseating granulomas. Systemic prednisone, oxytetracycline, and hydroxychloroquine, as well as topical betamethasone, were used for therapy. <b><i>Conclusion:</i></b> In our review there does not seem to be a clear link as to the definite cause of the MPCS. While the relationships to tuberculosis and autoimmunity seem to be often emphasized, there was no clear association with either etiology.