RETURN TO WORK AFTER SPINAL FRACTURE SURGERY: AN ANALYSIS OF PREDICTIVE FACTORS

<div><p>ABSTRACT Objective: To retrospectively evaluate factors that influence the return to work of patients of economically active age submitted to surgery due to spinal fractures. Methods: Patients aged between 18 and 65 years that underwent surgery after spinal fracture from 2012 to 2014 were selected. Through a specific questionnaire and review of the medical records, we identified factors that may have influenced the labor return of these patients. Results: Initially, 114 patients were allocated. After applying the inclusion criteria, 51 patients remained. Age, schooling, time to sit on the bed, and residual pain were the factors that influenced all outcomes. Other variables such as ISS (Injury Severity Score), segment of spine, number of affected vertebrae, associated lesions, and previous employment regimen had no influence. Conclusions: The rate of return to work after being submitted to surgery due to a fracture of the spine is related to age, schooling, residual pain, length of hospital stay, and the time the patient takes to be able to sit alone postoperatively. Physiotherapy positively influences the patient’s self-assessment regarding the ability to perform basic tasks. These variables can be used to identify a possible difficulty in the reallocation of these patients in the labor market.</p></div>