Pedagogiska imperativ och sociala nätverk i svensk medborgarbildning 1812–1828

2016-11-15T13:50:31Z (GMT) by Thomas Neidenmark
<p>This thesis in the History of Education studies the pedagogization of Swedish society from 1812–1828. These ambitions were promoted by state officials and educational innovators who we­re tightly knit through social networks. The research questions are: Why did these indi­vi­duals orga­nize themselves the way they did in the field of education? Which practices of external com­mun­ica­­tion and interaction within associations existed? Which impact did these practices of external communication and internal interaction have on the educational debate? Civic formation is analyzed through the activity or practices identified in the diffusion of useful knowledge, self-education, scho­ols, and educational policies. Arguments for civic formation, educational imperatives, are reflected in new words and new schools. The imperatives are in part an outcome of social networking studied through affiliations to associations, newspapers and governing boards. Hence, a great number of affiliations have been organized in a new and advanced web-based application.</p><p>Papers and associations were important to dissolving feudal society, and as key ingred­ients for the emancipation of the middle class, they gradually gained more in­fluence upon society. The educational reformers’ involvement in papers and societies were important for them coining new Swedish words with educational importance: it was an extern­al communicative practice. Involvement in associations is somewhat more internal and has been studied as leading to social interaction. This interaction is studied as social capital through social network analysis. This revealed focal points on the individual level which made a signi­fi­cant contribution to the educational debate. These were social networks sustained by the spi­rit of Enlightenment and emancipation. What has long been un­recog­ni­zed in the History of Edu­cation is presented as important features in this thesis through the analysis of social networks.</p>