On the Mathematical Principles of Supernatural Philosophy

2017-11-16T06:21:21Z (GMT) by John Smith
There is a unique and mysterious negative image of a naked crucified man on the Shroud of Turin that has proven impossible to duplicate. Skeptics say that it is a medieval forgery because the cloth was radiocarbon dated in 1988 to between 1260 and 1390 AD, but this is easily explicable, and all of the forensic and historical evidence other than this indicates that the 1988 result is wrong. The body-image -the result of oxidization and dehydration of the top-most micro-fibers of the cloth- is consistent with having been produced by a burst of high-frequency by radiation, and Dr John Jackson has proposed that the body image on the Shroud was produced by the effect of radiation on a cloth collapsing through a disappearing body. But there is something insufficient about the cloth-collapse theory. In particular, it cannot account for the undistorted nature of the image. An alternative explanation - first proposed as far as I know by the late ecclesiastical artist Isabel Piczek - is that there was a suspension of gravity at the moment of resurrection. Here we consider mathematical principles that a) stand in their own right b) explain the image on the Shroud and the skewed radiocarbon date and c) recommend Piczeg's explanation.