Music Therapy and Spiritual Care

2018-04-26T07:34:12Z (GMT) by Clare O’Callaghan Jane Edwards
<strong>Clare O’Callaghan & </strong><div><div><strong>Jane Edwards</strong></div><strong> (2018). Music Therapy and Spiritual Care. In: Carey, L.B. & Mathisen, B.A. <i><u>Spiritual Care for Allied Health Practice: A Person-Centered Approach </u></i>(Chapter 8: pp: 162-182). London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers [ISBN 9781785922206]. DOI</strong><div><div><div><a href="https://doi.org/10.4225/22/5ae180d70f71c" rel="noreferrer noopener" target="_blank"><strong>10.4225/22/5ae180d70f71c</strong></a></div><div><br></div><div><p><strong>Summary:</strong> Music therapy refers to the use of music-based methods in a professional relationship to improve biopsychosocial and spiritual wellbeing. In music therapy, patients and families tend to choose or play music that elicits feelings, thoughts, images, memories, spiritual states, and people with which/whom they want to be connected. When caring for people affected by life-threatening conditions, music therapists’ aims are similar to those of pastoral care workers/chaplains. This chapter presents research findings and case studies to illustrate how music therapists offer generalist spiritual care to support patients and their families.</p></div><div><br></div><div><br></div></div></div><br></div>