Mobilizing learning: transforming pedagogy with mobile web 2.0

2017-01-31T04:27:06Z (GMT) by Cochrane, Thomas Donald
This thesis reports on three years of action research mlearning (mobile learning) projects encompassing five different courses, forming five case studies spanning from one to three years of implementation and refinement. The five case studies involved thirteen mlearning projects undertaken between 2007 and 2009 with a total of 280 participants. The aim of the research was to investigate the potential of mobile web 2.0 tools to facilitate social constructivist learning across multiple learning contexts, including: both formal and informal, geographically disperse, synchronously and asynchronously. The research focused upon the use of smartphones termed Wireless Mobile Devices (WMDs), coupled with mobile formatted web 2.0 social software. The research used a participatory action research methodology, and based its pedagogical decisions upon the foundation of social constructivist learning theory. This thesis captures the learning journeys of the researcher and participants as they moved from initial skepticism to personal appropriation of the new technologies. Highlighting the ontological shifts required for integrating the unique affordances of these mobile web 2.0 technologies into the participants’ pedagogical practice and courses. Resulting in enabling collaborative learning environments that bridge multiple contexts. The research led to the development of an intentional community of practice model for lecturer professional development and scaffolding student learning. A resultant pedagogical design framework was established. Critical success factors were identified, and an implementation strategy for the integration of mlearning within tertiary education was developed. The research provides an example of action- research informed institutional change. This change involved the development of strategies that embed the purposeful appropriation of student-owned WMDs enabling social constructivist pedagogy. The mlearning projects have driven a reconceptualisation of teaching and learning across several courses within the institution. Additionally the thesis explores and extends emergent critical practice-based mlearning literature. The research adds the insights of a significant longitudinal study to the relatively new body of knowledge around mlearning.