MORTALITY AND FUNCTION AFTER SURGICALLY-TREATED HIP FRACTURE IN ADULTS YOUNGER THAN AGE 60

<div><p>ABSTRACT Objective: Hip fractures in young adults can cause poor functional capacity throughout life because of several complications. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate 1-year mortality and functional outcomes for patients aged 60 years or younger with hip fracture . Methods: We prospectively obtained data for all consecutive patients aged 60 or younger with any type of hip fracture who were treated operatively between 2008 and 2014. After one year, patient outcomes were evaluated according to changes in pain severity, functional status (modified Barthel index), and mortality rate . Results: Of the total of 201 patients, 132 (65.7%) were men (mean age: 41.8 years) and 69 (34.3%) were women (mean age: 50.2 years) (p<0.001). Reduced pain severity was reported in 91.5% of the patients. The mean modified Barthel index was 22.3 in men and 18.6 in women (p<0.001). At the one-year follow-up, 39 cases (19.4%) were dependent on walking aids while only 17 patients (8.5%) used walking aids preoperatively (p<0.001). Seven patients (4 men and 3 women) died during the one-year follow-up period; 2 died in the hospital after surgery . Conclusion: Hip fractures in young adults have a low mortality rate, reduction in pain severity, and acceptable functional outcomes one year after surgery. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study.</p></div>