ISSP2016: Role of Government V

<p>The third <a href="http://www.issp.org/">International Social Survey Programme (ISSP)</a> survey by COMPASS Research Centre at the University of Auckland.</p><p>Attitudes to compliance with the law; attitudes to various forms of protest against the government; views on freedom of speech for extremists; attitudes to justice error; views on state intervention in economy; views on government spending for environmental protection, public health system, the police, education system, defence, pensions, unemployment benefits, culture and arts.<br><br>Attitudes to welfare state and responsibility for jobs, price control, health care, decent standard of living, economic growth, reduction of income differences, support for students, housing supply and protection of environment; attitudes towards public/private partnership in providing services; attitudes towards personal responsibility; poverty attributions; attitudes towards financial penalties for those on benefits; views on who hold political power; attitudes towards surveillance measures of the authorities in case of security challenges; attitudes towards civil rights; interest in politics; political efficacy; attitudes towards children and youth participation; assessment of tax equity with various income groups; attitudes towards tax credits; views about the frequency of tax avoidance; perceived amount of politicians and public officials involved in corruption; how often asked for bribe by public officials.<br><br>Whether one believes referenda are effective; how one voted in the flag referendum; opinions on the need for future referenda; view on becoming a republic; attitude towards legalising cannabis; attitude towards voluntary euthanasia/assisted dying; preference for union jack on the flag; views on having a British head of state.<br><br>Demography<br>Sex; age; nation of birth; ethnicity; citizenship/residency; religion; attendance at religious services; education; current employment status; hours worked weekly; occupation; working for private or public sector or self-employed; if self-employed: number of employees; supervisor function; trade union membership; party vote in 2014; left-right wing scale; access to technology; hours spent on social media; personal and household income; household size; marital status; partner’s employment status partner’s occupation; organisation partner works for.</p>