ISSP2009: Social Inequality IV

2017-03-12T23:15:36Z (GMT) by Philip Gendall
<p>The nineteenth of 20 years of <a href="http://www.issp.org">International Social Survey Programme (ISSP)</a> surveys in New Zealand by Professor Philip Gendall, Department of Marketing, Massey University.</p><p>A verbose rundown on topics covered follows.</p><p>Attitudes towards social inequality. Social background and good relations as most important prerequisites for success in society; most important criteria for social mobility (scale: personal effort, intelligence or corruption); reasons for and acceptance of social inequality; Self-assessment of payment suitable for performance; estimation of actual and adequate monthly income for occupational groups; responsibility of government to reduce income differences; attitude to a progressive tax rate.</p><p>Assessment of the economic differences between poor and rich countries; attitude towards compensation by additional taxes in the wealthy countries (Redistribution); justification of better medical supply and better education for people with higher income; assumption of conflicts between social groups in the country; self-assessment on a top-bottom-scale and expectation of the individual level in 10 years; social mobility; criteria for the classification of payment for work (scale: responsibility, education, supervisor function, needed support for family and children or quality of job performance); feeling of a just payment.</p><p>Characterisation of the actual and the desired social system of the country, measured by classification on pyramid diagrams; Self-assessment of the respondent as well as classification of an unskilled factory worker and a chairman of a large corporation on a top-bottom-scale; number of books in the parental home in the respondent’s youth.</p><p>Demography: age; sex; living together with a partner; marital status; school education; denomination; occupation status; profession (ISCO code); occupation in the public sector; autonomy; working hours per week; net income of the respondent; supervisor function; occupation status, profession and supervisor function of the partner; household structure; family income; size of household; city size; region; own unemployment within the last few years and duration of this unemployment; religiousness; frequency of going to church; forms of the faith in God; Self-assessment of the social class; union membership; party preference; participation in elections; living situation and living status; in some countries: ethnic membership of the respondent.</p>