Fate of a Giant {Mo<sub>72</sub>Fe<sub>30</sub>}‑Type Polyoxometalate Cluster in an Aqueous Solution at Higher Temperature: Understanding Related Keplerate Chemistry, from Molecule to Material

When the giant icosahedral {Mo<sub>72</sub>Fe<sub>30</sub>} cluster containing compound [Mo<sub>72</sub>Fe<sub>30</sub>O<sub>252</sub>­(CH<sub>3</sub>COO)<sub>12</sub>­{Mo<sub>2</sub>O<sub>7</sub>­(H<sub>2</sub>O)}<sub>2</sub>­{H<sub>2</sub>Mo<sub>2</sub>O<sub>8</sub>­(H<sub>2</sub>O)}­(H<sub>2</sub>O)<sub>91</sub>]·150H<sub>2</sub>O (<b>1</b>) is refluxed in water for 36 h, it results in the formation of nanoiron molybdate, Fe<sub>2</sub>(MoO<sub>4</sub>)<sub>3</sub>, in the form of a yellow precipitate; this simple approach not only generates nanoferric molybdate at a moderate temperature but also helps to understand the stability of {Mo<sub>72</sub>Fe<sub>30</sub>} in terms of the linker–pentagon complementary relationship.