Ensemble Tanjidor

2017-06-05T06:40:32Z (GMT) by Kartomi, Margaret J. Kartomi, Hidris
For male participants. "Tanjidor band", consisting here of trumpet, saxophone, trombone, clarinet, horn, bass, cymbal and kettle drum. Tanjidor takes its name from the Portuguese word tangedor (player), a derivative of tanger meaning 'to make a twang' (as on the guitar). The Portuguese, from the sixteenth century, were a prevailing colonial influence in Indonesia until the Dutch took over a century later. In the Dutch colonial period, like in post-Independence times, tanjidor was usually associated with outdoor music appropriate to a procession and or military display, the kind of music played by brass bands. In this image, the tanjidor band 'Corps Pemuda Tkt I DKI' is playing at a wedding. (For more information, see Ernst Heins, "Kroncong and Tanjidor - Two Cases of Urban Folk Music in Jakarta" in Asian Music, 7/1, Southeast Asia Issue (1975), pp. 20-32; also Philip Yampolsky, "Betawi & Sundanese Music of the North Coast of Java: Topeng Betawi, Tanjidor, Ajeng", CD 5, Washington DC: Smithsonian Folkways Recordings) Copyright 1988. Notes prepared by Bronia Kornhauser with Margaret Kartomi, School of Music-Conservatorium, Monash University. Photography by Hidris Kartomi.