Are the links between mentoring and career advancement different for women and men?

2017-06-05T03:12:34Z (GMT) by Tharenou, Phyllis Zambruno, Edoardo
The aim of this study was to assess if mentoring is more positively related to career advancement for women than men. At Time 1, 5019 Australian employees were surveyed, of whom 3220 responded to a repeat survey a year later. Beyond organizational, job and individual variables, gender differences arose in the links of mentor support to career advancement, differently for career and psychosocial support. Women who reported more career support from their mentors, rather than less, reported more advancement a year later in terms of promotion, unlike men. Moreover, more than men, women who reported more psychosocial support from their mentors, rather than less, reported less advancement a year later, especially promotion. Although results were inconsistent, proteges with male rather than female mentors reported more advancement a year later, especially managerial level, irrespective of prot£ge gender. In addition, bidirectional tests using structural equation modeling showed that career advancement, for men and women, was related positively to career and psychosocial support a year later. And women with higher than lower salaries and managerial levels reported male mentors more a year later. Why gender differences arise in the relationships between mentoring and career advancement was discussed.