A systematic review of factors affecting driving and public transportation among youth and young adults with acquired brain injury

2017-06-20T14:26:38Z (GMT) by Sally Lindsay Andrei Stoica
<p><i>Purpose</i>: Although many people with an acquired brain injury (ABI) encounter difficulties with executive functioning and memory which could negatively affect driving, few people are assessed for fitness to drive after injury. The purpose of this systematic review was to synthesize the literature on factors affecting driving and public transportation among youth and young adults with ABI, post injury.</p> <p><i>Method</i>: Seven databases were systematically searched for articles from 1980 to 2016. Studies were screened independently by two researchers who performed the data extraction. Study quality was appraised using the Standard Quality Assessment Criteria (Kmet) for evaluating primary research from a variety of fields.</p> <p><i>Results</i>: Of the 6577 studies identified in the search, 25 met the inclusion criteria, which involved 1527 participants with ABI (mean age = 25.1) across eight countries. Six studies focused on driving assessment and fitness to drive, ten on driving performance or risk of accidents and nine studies explored issues related to accessing or navigating public transportation. Quality assessment of the included studies ranged from 0.60 to 0.95.</p> <p><i>Conclusions</i>: Our findings highlight several gaps in clinical practice and research along with a critical need for enhanced fitness to drive assessments and transportation-related training for young people with ABI.</p>